‘EducURIPed

It appears your child is suffering from an upper respiratory infection (URI) that appears viral in nature.  The treatment for a viral URI is often supportive treatment as the body will naturally clear this virus and there is not a medicine indicated to speed up this process.

1. Maintaining adequate hydration – Maintaining adequate hydration may help to thin secretions and soothe the respiratory mucosa. If the infant will drink milk/water that is wonderful. If not considered Pedialyte or watered down fruit juices/Gatorade.

2.  Nasal suction – Use of a nasal suction device such as nose Freda can be beneficial to clear the nasal passages and allow for improved breathing.

3. Saline Rinses – In infants, topical saline is applied with saline nose drops and a bulb syringe. In older children, a saline nasal spray or saline nasal irrigation may be used. It is important that saline irrigants be prepared from sterile or bottled water.

4. Humidified air – A cool mist humidifier/vaporizer may add moisture to the air to loosen nasal secretions.

5. Control Fever – You may use Tylenol if infant is greater than 3 months and Motrin if infant is greater than 6 months. You may rotate these medications every 4-6 hours.

6. Cough – Warm liquids that are age-appropriate may be beneficial to help control the cough.  Honey can be used in patients who are older than 1 year, however if the patient is less than 1-year-old honey is to be avoided.

Expected course of illness
In infants and young children, the symptoms of the common cold usually peak on day 2 to 3 of illness and then gradually improve over 10 to 14 days. The cough may linger in a minority of children but should steadily resolve over three to four weeks. In older children and adolescents, symptoms usually resolve in five to seven days (longer in those with underlying lung disease or who smoke cigarettes).

Indications for re-evaluation
Please bring patient back if they begin to experience difficulty breathing/swallowing, high fevers that do not resolve with Tylenol or Motrin.  If the cough persist for longer than 10 to 14 days I recommend they be reevaluated by his primary care physician.
It appears your child is suffering from an upper respiratory infection (URI) that appears viral in nature. The treatment for a viral URI is often supportive treatment as the body will naturally clear this virus and there is not a medicine indicated to speed up this process.

1. Maintaining adequate hydration – Maintaining adequate hydration may help to thin secretions and soothe the respiratory mucosa. If the infant will drink milk/water that is wonderful. If not considered Pedialyte or watered down fruit juices/Gatorade.

2. Nasal suction – Use of a nasal suction device such as nose Freda can be beneficial to clear the nasal passages and allow for improved breathing.

3. Saline Rinses – In infants, topical saline is applied with saline nose drops and a bulb syringe. In older children, a saline nasal spray or saline nasal irrigation may be used. It is important that saline irrigants be prepared from sterile or bottled water.

4. Humidified air – A cool mist humidifier/vaporizer may add moisture to the air to loosen nasal secretions.

5. Control Fever – You may use Tylenol if infant is greater than 3 months and Motrin if infant is greater than 6 months. You may rotate these medications every 4-6 hours.

6. Cough – Warm liquids that are age-appropriate may be beneficial to help control the cough. Honey can be used in patients who are older than 1 year, however if the patient is less than 1-year-old honey is to be avoided.

Expected course of illness
In infants and young children, the symptoms of the common cold usually peak on day 2 to 3 of illness and then gradually improve over 10 to 14 days. The cough may linger in a minority of children but should steadily resolve over three to four weeks. In older children and adolescents, symptoms usually resolve in five to seven days (longer in those with underlying lung disease or who smoke cigarettes).

Indications for re-evaluation
Please bring patient back if they begin to experience difficulty breathing/swallowing, high fevers that do not resolve with Tylenol or Motrin. If the cough persist for longer than 10 to 14 days I recommend they be reevaluated by his primary care physician.

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